History of Father’s Day~FYI

Origins of Father’s Day

The campaign to celebrate the nation’s fathers did not meet with the same enthusiasm as Mother’s Day–perhaps because, as one florist explained, “fathers haven’t the same sentimental appeal that mothers have.”

On July 5, 1908, a West Virginia church sponsored the nation’s first event explicitly in honor of fathers, a Sunday sermon in memory of the 362 men who had died in the previous December’s explosions at the Fairmont Coal Company mines in Monongah, but it was a one-time commemoration and not an annual holiday.

The next year, a Spokane, Washington woman named Sonora Smart Dodd, one of six children raised by a widower, tried to establish an official equivalent to Mother’s Day for male parents. She went to local churches, the YMCA, shopkeepers and government officials to drum up support for her idea, and she was successful: Washington State celebrated the nation’s first statewide Father’s Day on July 19, 1910.
  
Slowly, the holiday spread. In 1916, President Wilson honored the day by using telegraph signals to unfurl a flag in Spokane when he pressed a button in Washington, D.C.  In 1924, President Calvin Coolidge urged state governments to observe Father’s Day. However, many men continued to disdain the day. As one historian writes, they “scoffed at the holiday’s sentimental attempts to domesticate manliness with flowers and gift-giving, or they derided the proliferation of such holidays as a commercial gimmick to sell more products–often paid for by the father himself.

Father’s Day: Controversy and Commercialism

During the 1920s and 1930s, a movement arose to scrap Mother’s Day and Father’s Day altogether in favor of a single holiday, Parents’ Day. Every year on Mother’s Day, pro-Parents’ Day groups rallied in New York City’s Central Park–a public reminder, said Parents’ Day activist and radio performer Robert Spere, “that both parents should be loved and respected together.” Paradoxically, however, the Depression derailed this effort to combine and de-commercialize the holidays. Struggling retailers and advertisers redoubled their efforts to make Father’s Day a “second Christmas” for men, promoting goods such as neckties, hats, socks, pipes and tobacco, golf clubs and other sporting goods, and greeting cards.

When World War II began, advertisers began to argue that celebrating Father’s Day was a way to honor American troops and support the war effort.  By the end of the war, Father’s Day may not have been a federal holiday, but it was a national institution.

In 1972, in the middle of a hard-fought presidential re-election campaign, Richard Nixon signed an official  proclamation making Father’s Day a federal holiday at last. 

**Information from History.com edited**

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Streim

There is great peace and joy in knowing the Lord Jesus Christ as my Savior. I am blessed to serve our Heavenly Father through Him. Everyday is a new day to share the the glorious Gospel message of grace and forgiveness; the blessings of hope; the Father God's eternal promises; and the importance of living daily in the will of God according to the Scriptures, especially now with the world in chaos and uncertainty. My life before I asked God to forgive me of all my sin through the blood of Jesus Christ and I repented (turned away from it); was one of utter selfishness in all aspects of my life. I partied, I lived for ME and only me! Now, I live for Him, with great joy daily. I want to share the Gospel, encourage other sisters/brothers in Christ through prayer and do as He leads by the faith He's given through His abundant grace! Read more on my "About Me" page at my site.

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