Posted in Lessons from the Holy Bible, Listening To God, Living in Today's World, Seeking Truth?, Time for Sharing

Seven Rules For Daily Living

Seven Rules for Daily Living

BY JONATHAN GOFORTH

Jonathan Goforth (1859-1936) was a Canadian missionary to China. It is said of him that “when he found his own soul needed Jesus Christ, it became a passion with him to take Jesus Christ to every soul.”

The following rules for daily living were made by Dr. Goforth in 1894 and written on the fly-leaf of his Bible:

1. Seek to give much—expect nothing.
2. Put the very best construction on the actions of others.
3. Never let a day pass without at least a quarter of an hour spent in the study of       the Bible.
4. Never omit daily morning and evening private prayer and devotion.
5. In all things seek to know God’s Will and when known obey at any cost.
6. Seek to cultivate a quiet prayerful spirit.
7. Seek each day to do or say something to further Christianity among the lost.

“That Dr. Goforth lived up to these rules there is not the least doubt. He surpassed them. His love for the Bible is well known. His Bible was always open and he took every opportunity to read it. Even after becoming blind, he had a Chinese read to him at least twelve chapters a day. His loyalty to the Bible as the Word of God and his defense of the fundamentals of the Faith have been outstanding in his career.

“He was a man of prayer and through prayer and Bible study has sought to know God’s Will. It was this love for Bible reading and communion with God that gave him the power to move audiences to a conviction of sin and repentance. At all times he kept “self” in the background and relied wholly on the power of the Holy Spirit to take of the things of Jesus and reveal them unto his hearers. ‘Not by might nor by power, but by my Spirit’—’But ye shall receive power after that the Holy Ghost is come upon you’—have ever been his battle-cry. Though Dr. Goforth’s preaching contained a stern denunciation of sin and would in no case tolerate compromise with sin, he has always been very tender in dealing with the lost sinners.”

Rev. Allan Reoch.

**reference citation  Copied by Stephen Ross for WholesomeWords.org from Goforth of China by Mrs. Rosalind Goforth.  Appendix p. 355-356.  (edited by Stephanie Streim)
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Posted in Everyday News, Random, Time for Sharing

History of Father’s Day~FYI

Origins of Father’s Day

The campaign to celebrate the nation’s fathers did not meet with the same enthusiasm as Mother’s Day–perhaps because, as one florist explained, “fathers haven’t the same sentimental appeal that mothers have.”

On July 5, 1908, a West Virginia church sponsored the nation’s first event explicitly in honor of fathers, a Sunday sermon in memory of the 362 men who had died in the previous December’s explosions at the Fairmont Coal Company mines in Monongah, but it was a one-time commemoration and not an annual holiday.

The next year, a Spokane, Washington woman named Sonora Smart Dodd, one of six children raised by a widower, tried to establish an official equivalent to Mother’s Day for male parents. She went to local churches, the YMCA, shopkeepers and government officials to drum up support for her idea, and she was successful: Washington State celebrated the nation’s first statewide Father’s Day on July 19, 1910.
  
Slowly, the holiday spread. In 1916, President Wilson honored the day by using telegraph signals to unfurl a flag in Spokane when he pressed a button in Washington, D.C.  In 1924, President Calvin Coolidge urged state governments to observe Father’s Day. However, many men continued to disdain the day. As one historian writes, they “scoffed at the holiday’s sentimental attempts to domesticate manliness with flowers and gift-giving, or they derided the proliferation of such holidays as a commercial gimmick to sell more products–often paid for by the father himself.

Father’s Day: Controversy and Commercialism

During the 1920s and 1930s, a movement arose to scrap Mother’s Day and Father’s Day altogether in favor of a single holiday, Parents’ Day. Every year on Mother’s Day, pro-Parents’ Day groups rallied in New York City’s Central Park–a public reminder, said Parents’ Day activist and radio performer Robert Spere, “that both parents should be loved and respected together.” Paradoxically, however, the Depression derailed this effort to combine and de-commercialize the holidays. Struggling retailers and advertisers redoubled their efforts to make Father’s Day a “second Christmas” for men, promoting goods such as neckties, hats, socks, pipes and tobacco, golf clubs and other sporting goods, and greeting cards.

When World War II began, advertisers began to argue that celebrating Father’s Day was a way to honor American troops and support the war effort.  By the end of the war, Father’s Day may not have been a federal holiday, but it was a national institution.

In 1972, in the middle of a hard-fought presidential re-election campaign, Richard Nixon signed an official  proclamation making Father’s Day a federal holiday at last. 

**Information from History.com edited**